Conference Motion: Prioritising Proportional Representation

Below is the text of a conference motion which LDER have submitted for debate at the Liberal Democrat Autumn Conference this year. We are now waiting to find out whether the motion will be selected for this year’s agenda, and will report back to our members and supporters once this is known.

We would like to thank all of the individual Liberal Democrat members and local parties and who have supported the motion.

 


Conference Motion: Prioritising Proportional Representation

Conference notes:

i. The result of the 2015 General Election was even more undemocratic than usual, with the Liberal Democrats, the Green Party and UKIP gaining approximately one quarter of the total number of votes cast, but only 10 seats out of 650, while the Scottish Nationalists won 56 seats with about 4% of the votes cast.

ii. Opinion Polls show that this result has led to a sharp and sustained increase in support for Proportional Representation (PR).

iii. The results of local elections in England and Wales continue to be even less democratic than those in Westminster; whilst the system for local elections in Wales is now a devolved matter, in England it remains under the control of Westminster.

iv. The House of Commons and local authorities in England and Wales are the only UK public bodies elected using First-Past-the-Post (FPTP).

Conference welcomes:

a. Support for insisting on PR for the House of Commons as part of any future coalition deal, from Tim Farron and Norman Lamb during the 2015 leadership election, and from Nick Clegg earlier this year.

b. That other parties, including the SNP, Plaid, UKIP, Greens and some in Labour, are increasingly vociferous on the need for PR and are regularly engaged in cross-party discussions on this issue.

Conference believes:

i. The Government of any nation should be “Of the people, by the people, for the people”; therefore, the test of an electoral system should be not how fair it is to political parties, but how fair it is to people.

ii. The continued use of FPTP distorts all aspects of government and politics and thereby undermines every other Liberal Democrat objective; its replacement with PR should therefore be the top priority for the Liberal Democrats. Insistence on PR is consequently justified, in light of its unique impact as an enabler for everything else the Liberal Democrats wish to achieve.

Conference further believes that the case for the urgent introduction of PR is now overwhelming following the EU Referendum, which demonstrated the extent to which FPTP has allowed politicians to become distanced from the people they purport to represent.

Conference reaffirms existing policy in favour of the Single Transferable Vote (STV) as the system of PR that best delivers fairness to people.

Conference calls for:

1. Liberal Democrats to make the campaign for PR a top priority, taking the lead nationally and making the case on the basis of fairness to people.

2. The Federal Party to ensure that in any future negotiation of a coalition government, the Liberal Democrats will insist on a clear commitment to the earliest possible introduction of PR for the Westminster Parliament and local authorities in England.

Newsletter: Join the Demo for Democracy

The Demo for Democracy is being held to demand Proportional Representation for elections to the House of Commons. Organised by Make Votes Matter, it is on the anniversary of the most disproportionate election result in modern times.

As Liberal Democrats, we should be in the forefront of the campaign for electoral reform – so pass this on to your local party and get as many people as you can to come along.

Demo for Democracy 2015
Last year’s rally for electoral reform saw a strong Lib Dem presence

 

Conference Report

A lively Spring Conference at York saw us recruit several new members, with over 50 party members signing up to our mailing list.  Thank you to all those who visited the stall, and particularly to those who helped out: Crispin Allard, John Cochrane, Lisa French, Cliff Grout, Denis Mollison and Richard Lawrie, plus Ed Molloy from ERS.

We decided not to run a fringe event this year, instead supporting events organised by others:

  • The Electoral Reform Society held an event to present the results of their Citizens’ Assembly pilots and discuss how a Constitutional Convention might work.
  • Pro PR, a new organisation in the electoral reform field, hosted a debate on the merits of an electoral pact on the single issue of PR for the House of Commons.

Crispin Allard
Chair, LDER

Newsletter: March news and see you in York!

New Year, Renewed Fight

LDER members are creating an updated reform campaign pack for 2016’s elections. We will connect how we vote to the quality of Governments and local Councils we get. Our pack will set the need for reform in the 2015-2020 context, underscore what a fair system would mean for individual voters and provide campaigning material.  Send us any ideas you have on this – or chat with us at the York Conference.

See you in York

LDER is on stall 5 of the exhibition at York Conference, so come and see us there.

Fringe meeting dates for your diary:

1-2pm, Saturday March 12

Pro –PR  cross-party alliance meeting. What are the prospects for a cross-party electoral reform pact at the 2020 election? LDER exec member Denis Mollison is speaking.  Venue: Hilton Hotel; Micklegate Room

Also, our allies, the Electoral Reform Society, have a fringe meeting:

6-15-7.15pm, Saturday March 12

 ‘Paths to Democratic Renewal.’  As well as speakers, the Society will present findings from two (Southampton and Sheffield) recently held Citizens Assemblies.  Venue: Novotel Hotel; Riverside Room

16-year-olds enfranchised – we tried (part 2)

Early contender for Liberal Democrat peer of the year must be John Shipley, who tabled an amendment to the Cities and Local Government bill, which would have enabled 16-year-olds to vote in local elections. Sadly and revealingly, the amendment fell because Labour Lords failed to back us. It shows that Jeremy Corbyn’s brave ‘new politics’ is only spin-deep; given the chance to support change, Labour’s tribalist, command-and-control traditions shine through bright as ever. As we said last time, further democratizing the franchise is also a crucial progressive steps towards fairer, representative elections. Shame Labour doesn’t see it that way.

LDER at Autumn Conference 2015

Electoral reform was very much a hot topic at Liberal Democrat Autumn Conference 2015. At usual, LDER had a stall in the Exhibition Hall, modelled here by our secretary, Penny Goodman:

2015-09-19 12.43.22

Hundreds of visitors stopped by to talk to us, including a couple of well-known faces. Here, new party leader Tim Farron shares his passion for electoral reform with incoming LDER chair Crispin Allard:

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And here is Katie Ghose, Chief Executive of the Electoral Reform Society, deep in discussion with visitors to our stall:

2015-09-21 14.31.05

We had the pleasure of hearing Katie Ghose speak, too, on the Sunday evening as part of the ERS-sponsored fringe event, ‘Like Minds to Change Minds: building alliances for electoral reform’. Katie, Owen Winter MYP and Katherine Trebeck of Oxfam all spoke about the practical prospects for persuading people across all parties of the need for reform, and building alliances to achieve it.

The evening didn’t end there, though. Another fringe event on the topic of electoral reform followed, this time entitled ‘Changing the Political Map of Britain’, and concerned with the practical impact of STV for local government:

2015-09-20 19.45.27-2

STV for local government has been a campaigning priority for LDER over the past few years, so we were pleased to have the opportunity to find out more about the work which Lewis Baston and Martin Linton have done to model its effects in practice for every local authority in England. Our incoming chair Crispin Allard also spoke about the benefits of STV at local government level, as a means of ensuring better voter representation and more effective opposition on local councils. You can download your own copy of Lewis and Martin’s report here.

Newsletter: LDER at Autumn Conference

LDER will have a strong presence at our Bournemouth Autumn Conference.

 

Exhibition stall

We’ll be running our stall throughout Conference. You’ll find us at A19; so do drop by for the latest news and campaign material.

If you can spare an hour or two to help man our stall, please let Crispin Allard or Keith Sharp know. All offers appreciated.

 

LDER AGM

Our AGM will be held on Saturday September 19 at 4.30pm in the Marriott Highcliff – Blandford Syndicate 3.

We still have some vacancies on this year’s Executive so please contact Keith Sharp if you’re interested and want to know more about the role. We can accept nominations at the AGM itself.

 

Conference Fringe even

LDER is supporting the Electoral Reform Society’s (ERS) fringe event – ‘Like Minds to Change Minds’ – to be held on Sunday September 20 at 6.15pm in the main BIC Conference centre, Bayview 1. The session addresses a key issue for this Parliament: how to build cross-party and cross-organisation alliances for reform between now and 2020.

We know the Tory Government’s ears are closed to change; we know too there is more dissatisfaction than ever with our undemocratic electoral system. How to sustain momentum and mobilise for change, and the part Liberal Democrats can play, is the topic for debate.

 

Conference reception

ERS is hosting a drinks reception on Monday September 21, at 6pm at the Dean Park Inn. Entry eligibility – support for electoral reform!

 

And: Labour for Electoral Reform?

Jeremy Corbyn looks like the front-runner in the Labour leadership stakes. A Facebook page has been set up to ‘encourage’ him to embrace electoral reform if he wins. You can sign up here.

 

See you in Bournemouth.

Newsletter: Building momentum for reform

Spreading the word: The LDER exec, since the election, has been ensuring electoral reform stays high on the party’s agenda as we recover and move ahead. We secured pro-reform commitments from both leadership candidates*; and a Liberal Democrat Voice post placed reform firmly within the context of liberal principle, calling on our many new (and current!) members to join our group. We are also sprucing up our own promotional materials, including a new pull-up banner, which will hopefully be on display at our Autumn Conference stall.

Coming event: There’s a rally outside Parliament planned for July 25 – The Great Gathering for Voting Reform, being supported by civic reform groups. We’re keen to see a strong Liberal Democrat presence on the day, so if you can make it, please sign up at the Facebook event page here.

Ammunition: The Electoral Reform Society’s Election report (A voting system in crisis) has great analysis, facts and commentary on just how undemocratic May’s result was – e.g. the Tories gained a seat for every 34,000 votes; we had to secure over 300,000 votes per seat! (And of course, even worse for the Greens and UKIP, who needed votes in the millions for every seat won). Go to www.electoral-reform.org.uk for a free copy of the report.

Our AGM; and executive membership: With so much opportunity, we are looking for new Executive members to be elected at our AGM, to be held in September during Bournemouth Autumn Conference. It’s a fundamental cause for our party; and highly relevant given the distorted election result and pressing devolution debates. The Exec meets, via conference call, some six times annually as a core time commitment. Other activities are taken up as needed on a volunteer basis.

Help at our Conference stall – and a free pass! We are looking for enthusiastic members to help on our Bournemouth stall – this includes set up and the highly sociable activity of manning the stall for a few hours during Conference. And, we get three FREE exhibitor passes for helpers. Please contact Crispin Allard or Keith Sharp if you’re keen – please note though that July 24 is the deadline for registering for free exhibitor passes.

Keith Sharp

Chair – LDER Executive.

* Congratulations to Tim on becoming our new leader. We know his belief in electoral reform and look forward to working with him and his to create change.

Local government reform: a progress report from Spring Conference

At Spring Conference in March, Liberal Democrats for Electoral Reform focused on making the case for reform to local government elections in England and Wales. We were pleased to hear members from across the party raising the same issue at consultative sessions on both Political & Constitutional Reform and the next General Election manifesto, and to welcome a large and enthusiastic audience to our Saturday evening fringe: ‘Worst Past the Post: why local government desperately needs electoral reform’. You can see some pictures of the event, and of our conference stall here.

The fringe event, jointly sponsored by Liberal Democrats for Electoral Reform and ALDC, was ably chaired by Cllr Claire Hudson. Darren Hughes and Willie Sullivan from the Electoral Reform Society began the evening with a short film on the Scottish experience of STV. Chronicling the day of the 2012 local elections, this showed how STV had prompted major parties to extend their campaigning, while offering minor parties a real chance of fair representation. Voters reported that they found the system easy to use, and liked being able to vote for smaller parties without feeling that they were wasting their votes.

After the film, Darren and Willie reported that Prof. John Curtice’s research into the effects of STV on Scottish local elections had shown that the average number of candidates per ward has doubled, while uncontested wards have been eliminated entirely. They also pointed out that because STV had allowed the Conservatives to secure seats in areas of Scotland where they were previously shut out, this could encourage them to accept it in Wales, where similar conditions apply.

But even Liberal Democrats can sometimes benefit disproportionately from First Past the Post, as the next speaker and leader of Eastleigh Borough Council, Keith House, knows. Keith explained that the Lib Dems typically secure around 50% of the total vote across Eastleigh borough, but 90% of the council seats. This provided a firm foundation for the recent national by-election, but Keith was under no illusions about the disadvantages of single-party dominance at local level: for example, the absence of an effective opposition, or too little incentive to campaign.

At Hampshire County Council level, Keith explained that FPTP elections consistently allocate all of the rural wards to Tory councillors, while Eastleigh and Winchester are the preserve of the Lib Dems. STV would reflect voter preferences more accurately, giving both parties some representation in both contexts and allowing Labour to win seats as well. Keith’s view was that the need for all parties to cooperate in this situation would foster a much more progressive council overall.

We heard next from Baroness Jenny Randerson, former Welsh Assembly Member and current Welsh Officer Minister. Results for local elections in Wales are even more disproportionate than England thanks to the use of First Past the Post in ‘all-up’ block elections every four years. This system can allow one party to take all of the seats in a multi-member ward at once with less than 50% of the vote, and in Wales it meant that Labour increased their share of seats by 70% in a single election in 2012.

But, as Baroness Randerson explained, all-up elections do mean that voters in Wales are used to long ballot papers. In fact, some people already respond to these papers by trying to signal their preferences between the candidates: so STV would not be too radical a change from their perspective. The challenges in Wales were that powers over local government elections still rest with the UK Parliament, for whom the issue is not a priority, while any Labour Assembly Members who express support for change quickly come under pressure from their party to withdraw it.

Finally, Peter Facey from Unlock Democracy addressed practical strategies for achieving reform. He said that in both England and Wales, the most likely context for progress would be coalition negotiations: though for Wales, power over local government elections would need to be devolved first. In England, it needed to be a red-line issue for the Liberal Democrats. But for this to really work, it is not enough to just put it in our next manifesto. We need to articulate the case for reform clearly, and start work on persuading the other parties in advance.

Peter also set out what he felt would be the most persuasive argument in a coalition negotiation: that any party going into government inevitably loses councillors, as voters punish them locally for national issues. STV mitigates those losses, making them less extreme than under FPTP. He further argued that the power to choose electoral systems should be localised, not imposed from the top down. This, after all, lives up to the Liberal Democrat principle of freedom from conformity. It would also mean that we could campaign on it locally, presenting STV as a solution to the particular problems of an individual area.

After the panellists had set out the examples, the arguments and the strategy, the many very passionate and articulate questions which followed demonstrated how strongly Liberal Democrats feel about local government reform. If you would like to help Liberal Democrats for Electoral Reform to take this issue forward, and to strengthen the party’s voice on electoral reform more generally, you can join us by emailing info@lder.org.uk to request a membership form.

This article was originally published on Liberal Democrat Voice

Spring Conference 2013

Liberal Democrats for Electoral Reform can report a busy and successful Spring Conference.

The highlight was Nick Clegg stopping at the LDER stall and asking “So how do we get electoral reform, then?” And having heard Crispin’s 30-second pitch on electoral reform in local government, he said it was a great idea, and would we like to drop a line to David Laws?

Needless to say, a detailed paper on the principles, tactics and strategy of electoral reform in local government will be winging its way to David Laws and the Manifesto working group.

Our fringe meeting, co-hosted with ALDC and titled “Worst Past the Post: Why local government desperately needs electoral reform”, was standing room only. Those lucky enough to get in saw a fantastic panel of speakers exploring the issue in detail. A full report will follow shortly!

Other electoral reform news

The Liberal Democrat Political and Constitutional Reform Work Group is consulting on what party policy should be. Members who would like to send in their views can find the full consultation paper here. Note the deadline of 8 April.

Local democracy groups have been springing up around the country to campaign for democratic reform. If you’re involved in running a democracy group or are interested in getting one going in your area, there’s a Grassroots Democracy Meet Up in London on Saturday 6 April. See http://action.unlockdemocracy.org.uk/grassrootsmeetup for details.