August 2020 newsletter

Calling all activists

Make Votes Matter (MVM)  has announced an Electoral Reform Action Day this coming August 22. 

MVM is calling on proportional representation supporters to join in a nationwide groundbreaking campaign day.

It will be online due to COVID; a brilliantly effective virtual action day was held recently in Lewes, Sussex. Activists posted online pictures of family, friends and themselves by local landmarks. Lewes campaigners report reaching even more people online and through social media than through traditional methods such as street stalls.

MVM is using this as the template for grassroots local action on August 22.

So do sign up. Work with local like-minded people who would like to see true democracy in this country. With Labour showing some positive signs, we want to press hard for reform and make sure it’s the Liberal Democrats, long believers in the principle of equal, proportional voting, that are leading the charge.

Sign up here.

 

Join the MVM speaker panel

‘Sharing points and arguments for reform with like-minded people was a real and unexpected boost. I’m geared up like never before to spread the message’ – MVM speaker panel introductory session participant.

The MVM speaker panel is going well — and the response to the appeal in our last newsletter has been – well, not bad! That means – we’ve room for many more LD members to join the panel!!

Sign up and you’ll join an online group of about eight others and you each have a five minute speech slot for everyone to listen to and share feedback on. It is a very positive experience – so don’t wait!

Read more about volunteering to be a cross-party speaker here.

Sign up here (tick the box for ‘Cross party speaker’)

Then you’re lined up to speak to local LD parties or to other civic groups as MVM finds the speaking slots.

Our virtual conference fringe meeting is… ON!

Breaking new ground – 18.45 on Saturday September 26 is the date and time for our first-ever virtual fringe meeting. Our front bench spokesperson Wendy Chamberlain MP will be our key speaker, along with Darren Hughes, Chief Executive of the Electoral Reform SocietyPeter Dunphy of Unite to Reform; and Emma Knaggs, Grassroots Leader, Make Votes Matter.

It’s titled – UK: a ‘democracy’ that cheats the voter and we’ll explore how voters are left voiceless in the present rigged system; and how we are going to get change this time.

More to come – we’re also staging an online conference exhibition stall!

Sign up for the session as soon as the party announces more details.

 

PR questions at leadership hustings

We have to report disappointment here. LDER tried very hard to get the party HQ to agree to a themed leadership hustings on electoral reform. But we were turned down. We then applied for a Q&A session, which after initial encouragement, was also turned down… We move on…

LDER members have put forward questions about electoral reform to the various hustings that are taking place.  If it’s not too late by the time you get this, it would be great if you submitted questions that commit both Ed and Layla to PR as a key thrust of party policy.

Submit your question here.

 

Plenty else has been happening

Collaboration with the Green Liberal Democrats:

After a very quick turn-around, an event about PR and the environment took place during the Green Liberal Democrat (GLD) conference on 22nd June with Wendy Chamberlain and Klina Jordan as speakers, highlighting research showing that countries with PR are better at reducing carbon emissions etc. Klina and Wendy have each submitted an article each for the GLD magazine which is to be distributed to GLD members in August.

Building on our positive GLD experience, we are getting in touch with the Young Liberals to find ways of collaborating.

 

And other party groups…?

If you are a member of or have contacts in other Party Associated Organisations or SAOs, then it would be great if you could help us contact them. Let us know.

 

Wendy’s adjournment debate

Wendy Chamberlain led an adjournment debate in the Commons on June 8, where she cited the inequality and undemocratic results of the present electoral system. In particular, she told of the plight of the millions of ‘voiceless’ people in this country. For the Government, Chloe Smith MP came up with some rather esoteric responses, notably the unexplained politics of place… Thanks to good teamwork from our MPs (Christine Jardine, Wera Hobhouse and Layla Moran supported Wendy) Ms Smith acknowledged and agreed that proportional systems also maintain constituency links between electors and elected! Good ammunition for us next time our opponents try to hide behind that facade as an excuse for clinging onto the present system.
Over at the Labour Party

Many of us will have seen that the Labour Party recently decided to use the single transferable vote (ditching FPTP) for its internal elections to its National Executive Committee. This is great news in itself as it means Labour has taken a big step towards being more democratic. It also of course suggests more commitment to reform going forward. It’s too early to be over-optimistic (and we’ve been disappointed before) but we should acknowledge the efforts of reformers within the Labour Party who have battled long and hard to get this step forward.

Liberal Democrats and electoral reform: a history

At an Islington Liberal Democrats Proportional Representation event in February 2020, Keith Sharp gave a (slightly personalised) account of the liberal fight for equal, proportional voting: the wins, the losses, the lessons and the current opportunities.

Origins and Beliefs

Electoral reform has deep, principled roots for Liberal Democrats.

The Reform Act of 1918 greatly extended the voting franchise (men over 21 were given the vote and women, albeit from age 30, had the vote for the first time). But it also saw the already-existing first-past-the-post (FPTP) narrowly defeat proportional representation (PR) / single transferable vote (STV) as the chosen UK electoral system.

The Liberal Party’s response was swift. Electoral reform (STV) featured in its 1922 election manifesto and has ever since (as the Liberal Democrats since 1988) remained firm, if not always prominent, party policy.

We talk today of the need for party proportionality – percentages of seats at Westminster should match percentages of overall votes the parties receive. And that’s right. Yet, while party proportionality is a vitally important result of a voter centric system, it is not the sole guiding value.

In a liberal society, power and agency reside primarily with the individual; and with the individual in her/his social context (such as family, neighbourhood, locality or community.) The job of the electoral system is to deliver demo-cracy (demos = people), not state-ocracy or even political party-ocracy. Party proportionality is a welcome result of a voting system which reflects the voters’ preferences.

Of course – a point often made – electoral reform alone isn’t a sufficient cure-all for our democratic deficit. Other important proposals include a written constitution, coherent devolution, votes at 16, a defined role for deliberative democracy, proper rules for holding any future referendums, Lords, local government.

But what can be more critical, in a functioning democracy, than the core relationship between electors and their elected representatives – defined by the way in which we elect and hold them accountable and the complexion of the resulting Parliament (or Council or Assembly)?

Stirrings — the ’70s and ’80s

The two elections of 1974 – when (in February) Labour won more seats despite getting less votes than the Conservatives; and a big jump in Liberal votes still left them with only a handful of MPs* – saw the first upsurge interest in electoral reform. (The earnest but in those days long-marginalised Electoral Reform Society (ERS) was so overwhelmed with public and media interest that staff took the phone off the hook to stop the incessant phone calls). And the 1975 European Referendum not only produced a healing near-unity in this country; it exposed the rigidity and voter-denial of FPTP as politicians of different parties and stripes cooperated according to their stance on Europe.

Literature sprang up in the ’70s

Heady times… all this converted me from a latent to an active PR campaigner. I tracked down and, years before joining a political party, became a member of ERS. Reading the emerging literature on the issue I soon realised that it wasn’t only a matter of seats matching votes. FPTP did not – could not – reflect late twentieth century social change. Without reform, voter disillusion and a sense of powerlessness was setting in. This was leading to a distrust of politics and its institutions; to a decay of respect for democracy itself. It was so obvious; and all it needed (so I thought, with the blind optimism of youth) was to alert people/politicians to the problem and reform would happen. I had a lot to learn about the addiction of power and cynical self-interest masquerading as public concern.

As for those warnings back then about disillusion and distrust? Look around you today. They have all come to pass…

In 1981, the Social Democratic Party (SDP – breaking from Labour over Europe) backed PR. After two elections in alliance with the Liberals where FPTP blatantly dissed the wishes of millions of voters and distorted the result**, the SDP and Liberals merged in 1988 into the Liberal Democrats, under Paddy Ashdown’s leadership.

Achievements — the ’90s and noughties

In the 1992 General Election, Labour suffered its fourth successive defeat. By 1994, Tony Blair became Labour leader. Ashdown abandoned ‘equidistance’, moving the LDs decisively towards Blair’s Labour. In the mid ’90s the two parties collaborated on political reform (known as the (Robin) Cook- (Bob) Maclennan agreement). A Lib-Lab pact was surely on the cards…

Not to be. The 1997 election, where just 43% voted Labour, nevertheless gave Blair a 179 seat majority. Labour did not need the Liberal Democrats. A Cook-Maclennan provision – an Independent Commission on the Voting System – went ahead but was still-born. Yet the Jenkins Commission as it is known (after its Chair, the great liberal Roy Jenkins) remains an ingenious, erudite, rewarding study. Its remit – proportionality, stability, geographic link, and… extended voter choice – still guides reformers.

Remit of the Jenkins commission

Failure to get PR for Westminster, however grievous, shouldn’t mask the fact that significant progress was made. Devolution produced a parliament for Scotland and assemblies for Wales and London. The 1998 ‘Good Friday’ agreement created devolved government in northern Ireland. The European Parliament electoral system was reformed.

Every single one of these innovations rejected FPTP in favour of PR – not necessarily the best systems available (Jack Straw’s late decision to use ‘closed regional lists’ for the Euros was particularly regrettable) but the bottom line remained: FPTP was out, PR was in.

Scotland went further. A Lib-Lab Scottish government agreed to introduce PR (single transferable vote) for local Council elections from 2007.

I was lucky enough to be an Electoral Commission observer at the 2007 Scottish elections, spending a day visiting various polling stations and attending the overnight count in Galashiels. Everywhere I found quiet comfort with the voting system change. I remember in an Edinburgh cafe asking local customers if they knew about voting 1,2,3 rather than marking a cross. I didn’t finish – ‘You mean STV? Oh yes we know all about that. We’re fine with it’, said one lady, politely but
firmly.

So: what worked? There were three main conditions for progress and success:

  • Negotiation (not referendums) in:
  • Alliance or coalition (not ‘equidistant’); with a
  • ‘Non-threatening’ Labour (’90s Blair-style not ’10s Corbyn-style)

And the voters? They had not clamoured for voting change, but once they’d got it they liked what they saw and were keen to keep it.

History need not repeat itself, but surely there are clues there as to what works…surely.

Reversal – the tens

A referendum on the Alternative Vote (AV) was the political reform concession for the Liberal Democrats on going into coalition with the Conservatives in 2010. This was only ever a Labour party commitment (in their 2010 manifesto – no-one else’s) and yet AV became badged as a Liberal Democrat policy. Coalition partner, the Conservatives ruthlessly opposed it; policy-owners Labour were publicly split. AV was heavily defeated in the 2011 referendum.

Embarrassed, humiliated, defensive, the Liberal Democrats then hid away from electoral reform. While the Tories even advocated returning all public elections to FPTP, the LDs kept quiet, with the manifestos of 2015, 2017 and 2019 (see page 83 of the 2019 manifesto…) pushing reform to the margins.

2020 — out of despair comes…?

The December 2019 election was an unmitigated disaster. But out of it, maybe a renewal of hope:

  • January 2020: a front-bench Commons spokesperson appointed (Wendy Chamberlain MP)
  • Unite to Remain evolves into Unite to Reform, including electoral reform.
  • The party proposes a pro-electoral reform motion for its Spring Conference (York, March 13-15).
  • LDs for Electoral Reform, in York, stages a fringe meeting with Wendy Chamberlain and panellists from Wales LDs, Unite to Reform, ERS and Make Votes Matter. Theme: how to make reform happen this time.

Finally – the voter today

The downside (source: ERS research):

  • Many voters think we already have a proportional system, so don’t respond to calls for change.
  • Voters get democracy; and non-democracy (dictatorships) as concepts. But they don’t differentiate between levels or different shades of democracy. If there is a vote, it is democratic. End of story. So, saying ‘it’s not democratic enough’ doesn’t resonate.

The upside:

While voters may be not crying out for a new electoral system, in December 2019:

  • 61% of voters said they were dissatisfied with the state of UK democracy (University of Cambridge)
  • 32% of voters said they had voted tactically (Electoral Reform Society, p31)
  • Only 25% of seats were regarded as marginal i.e. where any change of party was possible. (BBC website report) ***

Surely these numbers show that PR is hugely relevant to voters in 2020? They should guide us towards our call to action.

 


Keith Sharp has long campaigned for an equal, proportional voting system. He was an elected Council member at ERS for 20 years until standing down last December. He was an Electoral Commission observer at the 2007 Scottish elections (held under PR systems) and is currently Vice Chair of Liberal Democrats for Electoral Reform. Keith is also a member of the Make Votes Matter Alliance-Building Committee which engages with both party and non-party activist groups.

March 2020

Notes:
* In February 1974, the Liberals won 14 (2%) seats with 19.3% of the vote; in October an 18.3% vote share produced13 (2%) seats (Butler, p268/269)
** in 1983 the SDP/Liberal Alliance won 23 (3.5%) seats with 25% vote share. With just 27% of the votes, Labour won 209 (32%) seats (Butler p269)
*** In fact, only 79 seats (12%) of seats changed hands (Electoral Reform Society, p34)

Sources:
Voters Left Voiceless: Electoral Reform Society (March 2020)
British Political Facts: David and Gareth Butler, Palgrave Macmillan (10th edition 2011).

Newsletter: Maintaining Momentum

Tim and reform
Tim Farron continues to make electoral reform a leadership focus – most recently as the first signatory in an Unlock Democracy-sponsored letter to The Times, calling for English councils to have enabling powers to introduce fair voting in local elections.

Electoral Reform rally – May 7
Our President, Sal Brinton, was a key speaker at a major rally for electoral reform in Westminster on May 7, supported by Make Votes Matter, Unlock Democracy and the Electoral Reform Society. She condemned the present system as putting ‘a real stranglehold on … politics for decades, and where large percentages of people feel their votes are worthless.’

The Liberal Democrats continue to work with reform groups and across political parties to build momentum for a change to the voting system.

Labour
Talking of other parties – John McDonnell, Shadow Chancellor, has renewed his call for Labour to formally support electoral reform. Here is part of what he said in a national newspaper:

“It should be no surprise that there’s massive opposition to so many of the present government’s flagship policies. The stark reality is that most voters explicitly rejected the Conservative manifesto last year… If we are serious about democracy…we can’t accept this. Parliament draws its legitimacy from representing the will of the British people.”

The link to this on our LDER Facebook page scored over 6,000 hits. We all know that the route to electoral reform needs one of the major parties to join the cause. Labour’s traditional fence-sitting (Jeremy Corbyn claims to be undecided on the issue) has until now resulted in eventual rejection of change. Is Labour finally coming to its democratic senses?

What we can do
Reform will come about through grassroots and local as well as through national level campaigning. Remember to lobby your MP and Councillors – as individuals, with the local party or with a group of friends (not necessarily LDs) – on local and Westminster reform. A focused set of emails will do the job.

David Rendel
LDER would like to add our own tribute to the many others already paid to David Rendel who sadly passed away in May. David was of course a staunch, outspoken Liberal throughout his life. For us, electoral reform was his top priority – he was one of the founding members of LDER, and served on our Committee until standing down to concentrate on contesting a parliamentary seat in the 2015 election. He will be greatly missed.

A memorial celebration of David’s life will be held in Newbury’s Corn Exchange on Monday 4 July from 1.00pm. All members are invited to attend.

Crispin Allard
Chair, LDER

Newsletter: LDER at Autumn Conference

LDER will have a strong presence at our Bournemouth Autumn Conference.

 

Exhibition stall

We’ll be running our stall throughout Conference. You’ll find us at A19; so do drop by for the latest news and campaign material.

If you can spare an hour or two to help staff our stall, please let Crispin Allard or Keith Sharp know. All offers appreciated.

 

LDER AGM

Our AGM will be held on Saturday September 19 at 4.30pm in the Marriott Highcliff – Blandford Syndicate 3.

We still have some vacancies on this year’s Executive so please contact Keith Sharp if you’re interested and want to know more about the role. We can accept nominations at the AGM itself.

 

Conference Fringe event

LDER is supporting the Electoral Reform Society’s (ERS) fringe event – ‘Like Minds to Change Minds’ – to be held on Sunday September 20 at 6.15pm in the main BIC Conference centre, Bayview 1. The session addresses a key issue for this Parliament: how to build cross-party and cross-organisation alliances for reform between now and 2020.

We know the Tory Government’s ears are closed to change; we know too there is more dissatisfaction than ever with our undemocratic electoral system. How to sustain momentum and mobilise for change, and the part Liberal Democrats can play, is the topic for debate.

 

Conference reception

ERS is hosting a drinks reception on Monday September 21, at 6pm at the Dean Park Inn. Entry eligibility – support for electoral reform!

 

And: Labour for Electoral Reform?

Jeremy Corbyn looks like the front-runner in the Labour leadership stakes. A Facebook page has been set up to ‘encourage’ him to embrace electoral reform if he wins. You can sign up here.

 

See you in Bournemouth.